Transparency Measurement Reply

Did you ever walk into a glass door? The challenge is to make the product “invisible”, i.e. homogenous without any irregularities. Transparency is more than just the ability to transmit light. The perceived quality of a transparent product is dependent on how “good” we can see the objects behind it. It can appear crystal clear, hazy or unsharp. The human eye can perceive fine variations in sharpness as well as loss of contrast.

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The Objective Eye for a Clear View Reply

Our modern high-tech world is no longer imaginable without transparent products. We are so used to their “invisibility” that we only notice them if defects diminish their transparency, and consequently, their final usage. If due to varying quality of the packaging film the same chocolates appear different on the shelf, the nice holiday photos appear hazy on the smart phone, or the motorcycle helmet’s face shield easily gets scratched – then, all of this will affect our quality expectation and can even become a hazardous risk. More…